LVT Flooring

Can you lay LVT on top of LVT?
LVT flooring is very versatile in terms of installation, and in most circumstances, all that is required is a stable subfloor. But what if you already have an LVT flooring that is looking weary or dated and want to replace it with a brand new set of tiles?
Can you place LVT on top of LVT to save time and effort, or does the previous LVT need to be removed? This is what I explain in the next post, and I’d like to begin by stating that it is doable!
Understanding Luxury vinyl tiles (LVT)
Luxury Vinyl Tile Flooring is becoming one of the most popular flooring kinds due to its adaptability. It’s tough, water-resistant, comfortable to walk on, and comes in a huge variety of colors and patterns. You can essentially replicate hardwood and stone flooring at a fraction of the expense.
The tiles are made up of several layers, with vinyl serving as the core component. Other layers include transparent protective ones on top, an underlay, and a strong core that provides the majority of the stability. Indeed, rigid core luxury vinyl flooring features a thicker central core, which increases the flooring’s durability.
LVT flooring is typically installed on a firm and level subfloor, such as chipboard, plywood, or even floorboards. However, as long as the floor is sturdy and level, it can be put over other materials, particularly existing vinyl floor tiles.
Layering LVT has advantages and disadvantages, which should be considered before making a final decision.
Pros
Quick installation: LVT flooring is exceptionally easy to install, even without the extra benefit of not needing to prepare a subfloor. However, by putting your new LVT over the existing floor, you will save a lot of time and labor. Yes, the old flooring must be prepared, but this is a minor work when compared to installing a completely new subfloor.
Cost-effective: By putting LVT over LVT, you avoid the additional cost of having someone to remove your old floor if you are unable to do it yourself. There is no need to pay for new subfloor materials, either.
Great final results: If the previous LVT is in excellent shape and you have a solid subfloor, your new LVT flooring will look fantastic! Nobody will ever notice that there is a layer of LVT underneath, and you may bask in the glory of your sleek new floor.
Cons
No subfloor analysis: LVT performs best when laid over a strong, level subfloor like plywood or chipboard. If you have an existing layer of LVT, you cannot inspect the integrity of the subfloor beneath it, which could be hiding damage and causing problems in the future.
Adhesion problems: Glue-down LVT adheres the tiles to your subfloor using an adhesive, which can be influenced by defects in the previous LVT. For example, if there are cracks or substantial damage, the adhesive may not function, or you may experience movement and instability after installing the tiles.
Before You Begin Installing LVT over LVT
We’ve demonstrated that you may install LVT over LVT, but you must first evaluate the condition of your old LVT, consider the subfloor beneath, and ensure that it is ready to take the new layer of LVT flooring.
Current vinyl quality assessment
Hopefully, your previous vinyl flooring was put on a sturdy, high-quality subfloor. As previously said, this is a disadvantage because you cannot inspect the subfloor without removing the LVT (which you should avoid).
All you can do is inspect the existing LVT for cracks, chips, and damage. Laying LVT atop damaged LVT may produce instability or adhesion issues.
Preparing the existing vinyl.
To install the new LVT flooring, you must also prepare the old tiles. Ensure that they are clean and free of dirt and grime, as this can limit adhesive efficacy (if using glue-down LVT).
Also, examine the old floor’s leveling. Ideally, there should be no deviation; if there is, you may need to use a levelling screed before placing the new tiles.
LVT Flooring can be installed over virtually any subfloor.
So, can you apply LVT on top of LVT? Yes!
This is why LVT is so popular: it is more flexible and easier to install than carpets or hardwood floors. This should not be done without caution and planning, and it is always crucial to follow the manufacturer’s instructions and any warranty rules.

LVT Flooring